Meyer Lemon Chicken

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Teaching parent-child cooking classes has been such a rewarding experience, especially for someone new to kids + nutrition. While the hospital physicians are able to refer overweight kids and families, the grant is working to stretch the food dollar. I mean, it’s a win-win situation for all parties involved.

I love team-teaching the class and having other professionals to plan with and enjoy the responsibilities and joys of teaching. The newspaper came this Wednesday and even did a story on the whole program. We’re drawing the attention of parents, teachers, medical professionals, and many more people throughout the community. It’s exciting stuff!

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This week I fielded a phone call from one of the moms in the class.

“My daughter will at least try everything we make in the cooking class, but when we get the ingredients home to recreate the meal, she won’t touch it. What am I doing wrong?” she pleaded.

“Are you involving her in the meal preparation?” I asked.

She responded no, because of homework. While homework is a very valid excuse, I explained that helping prepare the meals is what encourages kids to actual eat the meals they prepare. Our elementary school participants use butcher knives and the oven…with supervision. And they don’t make “kid” food — they make orzo, salsas, and jambalaya!

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While I do not have children of my own (yet!), I find working with children a lot like working with husbands. Well, at least my husband. He doesn’t like to be left in the dark about the meals we’ll eat during the week. He doesn’t enjoy being “surprised” with a Meatless Monday…every Monday.

Unlike my kiddos, husband wants nothing to do with meal prep (OR CLEAN-UP!), but he does like having a say in dinner plans. This meal satisfied his request for “normal” meals — a traditional meat and potato, if you will. I don’t often cook with bone-in chicken and bake in the skin, but heavens does it make for some juicy chicken. Yum!

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Meyer Lemon Chicken slightly adapted from Cooking Light

2 (8 oz) skin-on, bone-in chicken breast halves
2 (5 0z) skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs
1 tsp kosher salt, divided
3/4 tsp black pepper, divided
2 Tbsp olive oil, divided
1 lb small red potatoes, quartered
1 Meyer lemon, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices and seeded
1/4 cup shallots, finely chopped
4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 tsp thyme leaves, chopped
1 cup low-sodium chicken stock, divided
1 tsp cornstarch
2 Tbsp fresh Meyer lemon juice
2 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp fresh parsley leaves

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 F.

Heat a large ovenproof skillet, dutch oven, or cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Sprinkle chicken with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Add chicken to pan, skin side down; cook 6 minutes or until skin is golden brown and crisp. Turn chicken over. Place pan in oven. Bake at 400 for 12 minutes or until a thermometer inserted in thickest portion of chicken registers 165 F.

Remove chicken from pan; keep warm. Discard pan drippings (do not wipe pan clean). Add 1 tablespoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add potatoes to pan; sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt. Cook potatoes 3-4 minutes on each side or until browned. Remove potatoes from pan. Add lemon slices to pan; cook 1 minute on each side or until browned. Remove lemon from pan. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add shallots and garlic; sauté 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add wine and chopped fresh thyme; cook 3-4 minute or until liquid almost evaporates, scraping pan to loosen browned bits.

Return potatoes and lemon slices to pan. Add 2/3 cup stock, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper; cook 2 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Combine remaining 1/3 cup stock and cornstarch, stirring with a whisk. Add cornstarch mixture to pan; bring to a boil. Cook 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in lemon juice and butter, stirring until butter melts. Return chicken to pan, turning to coat; sprinkle with parsley.

Yield: 4 servings (1/2 breast and 1/2 thigh, skin not eaten, with 1/2 cup potatoes and 3-4 tablespoons sauce)

Nutrition Information (per serving): 429 calories; 19.3 g. fat; 45 mg. cholesterol; 825 mg. sodium; 26.5 g. carbohydrate; 2.8 g. fiber; 35.0 g. protein

Result: Simple flavors with a lot of tang from the lemons and wine. This recipe called for olives which I left out, but I think capers would work great, too. As is was fabulous, however. The chicken was incredibly moist and took on a lot of lemony goodness. And the potatoes…so tender in the Meyer lemon sauce. Delicious!

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 February 1? Cray-zee. It sure looks and feels like February around Michigan – brrr! TGIF!

Be well,

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Comments

  1. says

    IT’s so true, involving the kids makes all the difference. If it’s just “made by mom or dad” it’s not as cool!!
    Question for you Nicole….do you write the grants for these projects? I’m asking because I have an opportunity that may involve me writing grants and I wanted to know if you enjoyed it (I just read that on this post).

    • Nicole, RD says

      Hey! Sorry, Gina…been meaning to respond! I had a grant writing class in grad school, but I do not write the grants…our marketing departmetn actually does them. As for this particular cooking class, we partner with the local school district that is responsible for sending nutrition educators into the schools. Their program receives funding from grants and the USDA…I wish I knew more of the details!

  2. ruth says

    this recipe sounds and looks awesome!!!!

    one question – the instructions mention olives, but I didn’t see them in the ingredients list. Is it right under my nose and I just missed it?

    • Nicole, RD says

      No, you’re not missing it…I need to take that out of the directions as I did not use them. Thanks for letting me know :)

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